Letters to Tom — Walking

Dear Tom:

One of the things I missed while recently traveling was my morning walk. I was getting back in the habit after my surgery. I don’t wear earbuds and listen to a book on tape, although that might be a more efficient use of my time. Instead I use the time to listen. To listen to a voice that is usually faint but always present. The faintness is why I am always pleased when I walk on a beach or a park away from the noises of distraction — the beeping of a backing truck, the constant scream of city sirens, or the frantic hum of rush hour traffic.

My ideal walk is when I can slow down and withdraw in order to hear. It is like prayer, less about what I say, and more about what I hear. It is time set apart with God, which is like emerging on a hike from the middle of a forest onto a mountain peak. It gives me perspective and helps me see where I have been and where I am going.

Discerning God’s voice seems easier while I walk. Often it come in a series of prompts. A thought of a friend may be a prompt to call him or drop him a note, a smell of the trees brings a memory and a resolve to rediscover something from our past, or I might be prompted to write down a thought that becomes a meditation I post. I know the prompting comes from God.

Your Friend,

Webb

About the author

Webb Hubbell, former Associate Attorney General of The United States, is an author and speaker. His novels, When Men Betray, Ginger Snaps, A Game of Inches, The Eighteenth Green, and The East End are published by Beaufort Books and are available online or at your local bookstore. When Men Betray won one of the IndieFab awards for best novel in 2014. Ginger Snaps and The Eighteenth Green won the IPPY Awards Gold Medal for best suspense/thriller.

1 Comment +

  1. I love this post, Webb. My sabbatical study in the spring is a scholarly project on walking as an invention strategy for writers. Thank you for your posts, and I’m glad you’re doing so well!

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